Detective Rick Lee, the NYPD’s only known hipster cop, is hanging up his skinny jeans.

Detective Rick Lee, the NYPD’s only known hipster cop, is hanging up his skinny jeans.

After 25 years, Lee, 51, has retired, and his last day on the books is Friday. He has been using up vacation days since he put in his papers in January.

Lee, 51, rose to fame as the level-headed 1st Precinct Community Affairs officer who dealt with the Occupy Wall Street protesters in 2011. He even graced the pages of GQ magazine.

“Yes, I lose my superpowers on Friday,” Lee said wryly in an interview with the Daily News on Wednesday. “For the first time since I was 14 years, I don’t have to be anywhere or do anything.”

Lee earned attention for his sartorial splendor during the 2011 protests and occupation of Zuccotti Park in the financial district.

Lee, poses for a photog in Zuccotti Park in October 2011.

Corey Kilgannon in the New York Times wrote, “There are many unknowns about the Occupy Wall Street protest in downtown Manhattan: Where is the next march? Who are its leaders? But an even bigger question, perhaps, has emerged: Who is the Hipster Cop?”

Adrian Chen wrote in Gawker that Lee “was like that cool detective at the police station that nobody wants to talk to about movies or music or anything ‘cause he’ll scoff at them.”

As a Community Affairs officer, it was his job to try to coax the raucous protesters away from blocking the sidewalk and to diffuse tensions between them, police and passing workers and residents.

“It was an interesting time,” he said. “That being a big event that happened to the community. I was down there doing my job, trying to keep everyone calm.”

‘It was funny how that whole thing kind of grew, that hipster cop thing,’ says Lee.

Lee became a target for bloggers who were suspicious that he was there to spy on them.

A Gothamist story about Lee had the headline “Hipster Cop Distracts From Police Brutality.”

“It was funny how that whole thing kind of grew, that hipster cop thing,” he said. “I wasn’t a spy, but it’s the internet and free speech and people can write whatever they want.”

Lee said that while he supports their right to demonstrate, he doesn’t think that in the end, the protests accomplished very much.

Lee is set to retire on Friday.

“The people pulling the strings had a different agenda than the people in the street,” he said. “There were people down there who just had an issue: organic farming or no nukes. The organizers were more, ‘We need a new system.’ They wanted Russia, 1917.”

Lee counts his work helping people get back to their homes after the 9/11 attacks and experience on events during the Tribeca Film Festival as among his proudest moments.

“Community Affairs is a buffer between chaos and not having chaos,” he said. “You can go up to people and say, hey, let’s talk about this without the threat of arrest.”

This article was sourced from http://moviesandnews.com